Why Is The “Right To Repair” So Important?

A few months back, many iPhone 6 users were faced with Apple shutting down their iPhones with one of their software updates. Those users had made repairs on their phones, without using an authorized repair shop. Apple’s decision caused a public outcry and eventually, they reverted these changes in their next version of iOS.

This is the same situation that happens whenever an owner of a John Deere tractor attempts to make repairs through someone who is not authorized. After fixes are made, they are still required to have a John Deere representative come out and authorize the repairs, which is another added on expense and time consumer. Many of these farmers are fighting this because it could slow down their work in the field.

If this is not something that Apple is allowed to get away with, why is John Deere getting away with it?

Whether you’re wanting to fix your iPhone or the John Deere tractor in your field, the “right to repair” is a vital factor to support your livelihood.  At least eight states have been considering laws to protect the user’s “right to repair”. This “right to repair” will cause the users to have the chance to get more life out of the device, instead of tempting the user to just toss the device into the trash. Big or small, electronic devices contribute to the 20 to 50 million metric tons of e-waste that we produce every year, worldwide. When a device is harder to repair, it is more likely to be tossed into a landfill, even if there are laws that attempt to prevent this.

E-waste is extremely dangerous if it ends up in landfills. Batteries can explode and cause fires and many chemicals can get into the ground water surrounding the landfills. Instead of keeping up the habit of running to the store to buy a new device every time something breaks, we should be taking the device to the repair shop to extend the life of the item. While we are fighting for the ability to access the information to fix our devices ourselves, there are still companies like EPC, Inc. that offers service and repairs on many of your electronic devices.

EPC will always attempt to repair first, using our award-winning service department.   But if the machine is truly end of life, EPC’s Electronic Recycling Center, de-manufactures and recycles your e-waste to reduce the amount that ends up in landfills. Most electronics are 100% recyclable and EPC follows the BAN e-Steward guidelines while recycling all raw materials. We also take data security very seriously and any data recycled devices is destroyed according to the NIST 800-88 Guidelines to ensure the privacy of our customers.

Stop in to our St. Charles, MO location today to get your electronic devices repaired by our award-winning service department!